Analyze Points of Entry

Line-Based Events

        Users can draw and name any number of lines on their camera feeds. Each line is defined by two endpoints and a direction, which indicates a “forward” and “backward” way to cross the line. Users can then set the system to count the number of people, cars, or animals that cross the line in each direction. The lines can also be set to trigger real-time alerts if they are crossed, or if they are crossed a certain number of times. This has many analytic applications, from traffic data collection to counting store entries. 

        Person counting is one of the most everyday useful functions of the BASS system. Users can draw lines anywhere and their camera feeds to count foot traffic. The system keeps an ongoing count of those lines, saving both positive crosses (entries) and negative crosses (exits). The counts continue until they are reset, or unless they’re programmed to reset regularly, every 24 hours for instance, using state management. At any given time, the positive minus the negative crosses for all lines drawn on building entry points gives the current capacity. This capacity counting is great for automating the enforcement of regulations, such as fire codes or capacity limits set in response to COVID-19. Outside of regulatory compliance, capacity counting is invaluable analytics, especially when viewed over time. It can help gauge marketing efficacy, or identify and predict peak business hours. Lines can also be used to answer questions about the internal traffic flow of businesses (checkout aisle usage, amenity use at hotels, etc). City planners or retail developers can measure foot traffic outside buildings to help quantify location value.

        Vehicle counting is a basic data collection operation for BASS. Users draw a line on a road or parking lot and assign a positive and negative direction to it.for large roads users can draw a line for each lane. The system counts cars, trucks, motorbikes, and bikes independently. Cities and states collect traffic data all over the country all the time using far less efficient means. With two camera streams, BASS provides data on cumulative traffic, traffic by vehicle type, and even performs directional counting. Data on cars entering business parking lots is useful for understanding what portion of customers entering your store are coming as a unit. For users who own buildings, information on traffic patterns outside are invaluable in resale

        Directional counting yields data on what direction counted objects come from and go to. For example, at a 4 way intersection, there are twelve possibilities: turning left, right, or going straight from each of the 4 directions. This information is also useful at stores to understand how customers interact with the floorspace of a business, particularly a retail space. Users draw out the paths objects could take that they wish to count, and the system counts them until it is reset. This can also be used to enforce one-way aisles in retail stores during the pandemic. 

        Person counting is one of the most everyday useful functions of the BASS system. Users draw lines anywhere on any feed and assign a positive and negative direction for crossing it. The system has an ongoing count of that line, saving both positive crosses (entries) and negative crosses (exits). The count continues until it is reset, or unless it is programmed to reset regularly, every 24 hours for instance, using state management. At any given time, the positive minus the negative crosses for all lines drawn on building entry points gives the current capacity. Lines can also be used to answer questions about traffic flow within businesses (checkout aisle usage, amenity use at hotels, etc). Outdoor cameras can also give data on foot traffic outside businesses to give data on signage and marketing efficacy.